Author Topic: Transverse Wave and Longitudinal Wave  (Read 330782 times)

Fu-Kwun Hwang

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Transverse Wave and Longitudinal Wave
« on: January 29, 2004, 06:47:37 pm »
Registed user can get files related to this applet for offline access.
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This java applet let you visualize the difference between transverse wave and longitudinal wave.
 You will find both moving wave and standing wave.



 Usage :
1. You can view transverse wave or longitudinal wave from the above selection.
2. Those blue lines on the left are dispacements relative to the equilibrium point, while those red lines on the right are relate to velocity of wave medium at those points.
3. The distance between two circle dots are 0.5 wavelength. (moving out of phase)
   Click and drag left mouse button to move them horizontally but keep the same distances.
   Click the right mouse button to locate position for one of the black dot,
   drag the right mouse button to position the second one.
   The distance between dots will be shown in unit of wavelength.
 4. Click the right mouse button and release it at the same location to toggle the animation.


Registed user can get files related to this applet for offline access.
Problem viewing java?Add http://www.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/ to exception site list
If java program did not show up, please download and install latest Java RUN TIME

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topic14
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2004, 12:48:06 pm »
Subject:
Date: Tue, 27 Apr 1999 23:05:21 +0100
From: "Anthony Vinters" <Tony@g0wfg.demon.co.uk>
To: <hwang@phy03.phy.ntnu.edu.tw>
I have found the tansverse and longitudinal waves. They are excellent,
exactly what is needed. Being able to show the the phases of particles
relative to each other is very useful.
I will be able to direct my students to your site so they can see for
themselves.
Once again thank you for your efforts the results are most pleasing.
Mr.A.E.Vinters.
Rishworth School

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hi
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2004, 05:38:42 pm »
no

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thanks
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2004, 01:40:05 am »

my name is nabeel razzaq......my A level physics exam is tomorrow morning....i discovered this site right now....and i swear it been a great help to me...now i am comfortable i know many things....my concepts are clear....thank you to how ever made this site.....high regards for him.... :P

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Re:u were trying to cheat and u knought it
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2004, 11:11:58 pm »

[quote:b36c9c9c8f="nabeel"]my name is nabeel razzaq......my A level physics exam is tomorrow morning....i discovered this site right now....and i swear it been a great help to me...now i am comfortable i know many things....my concepts are clear....thank you to how ever made this site.....high regards for him.... :P

Patrick Roche

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topic14
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2005, 03:37:57 am »
I would very much appreciate getting the code for the transverse/longitudinal wave applet.

Fu-Kwun Hwang

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topic14
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2005, 08:15:26 am »
You should have received it at your email account! However it was written many years ago with JDK1.0.2.

chfahlke

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transverse/longitudinal wave applet
« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2005, 07:00:37 pm »
Dear Dr Hwang,
I would very much appreciate getting the code for the transverse/longitudinal wave applet.
Thank you very much.
Sincerely yours,
Christoph Fahlke

abdalla

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topic14
« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2006, 02:37:08 am »
thanks ??? amazing :lol:

royfairs

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topic14
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2006, 09:33:17 pm »

As a physics teacher of some 32 years I find this site has a compact collection of a lot of the demos I've used in a compact format. Well done. Is there any simple book that can be used to develop futher ones?

Thanx & rgds Roy


Fu-Kwun Hwang

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topic14
« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2006, 11:01:58 pm »
Some of the applets are created almost 8-10 years ago with JDK1.0.2.

However, there are many recently generated simulaton were build by a tool called Easy Java Simulation.

You can find out article about EJS from Easy java simulation (Download and related informations)

You can find a book about EJS from Paco's web site. (Author of EJS)

And you should be able to download all the simulation when you login to the system.


Fu-Kwun :-)

Rennaman

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Re: Transverse Wave and Longitudinal Wave
« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2007, 06:19:13 am »
I just found this website. Thank you for taking the time to create it and make it available to teachers and students. I plan to use it in a lesson on waves this week!

Dave Menshew, M.A.Ed. NBCT
Lead Teacher, James C. Enochs High School
Forensic Biotech Career Pathway Program

rajettan

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Re: Transverse Wave and Longitudinal Wave
« Reply #12 on: August 24, 2007, 08:14:11 am »
your explanation and animations are great.but one doubt.why light is transverse?

Fu-Kwun Hwang

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Re: Transverse Wave and Longitudinal Wave
« Reply #13 on: August 24, 2007, 10:34:33 pm »
You can say it is the law of nature.
I do not know if you can accept the following explanation:

Light is electro-magnetic wave. It is the change of electric field which cause the magnetic field produced at near by space (the direction of induced magnetic field is perpendicular to electric field).
And the change of magnetic cause the electric field produced at near by space(the direction of induced electric field is perpendicular to the magnetic field).
Think about the direction of electric/magnetic flux and you will know the distribution of induced magnetic/electric field. 
And the above continuous process is what we called wave.
From the definition: we know it is a transverse wave. (I use other laws: Faradays's law etc. to explain the direction between E and B field)
Try to draw it by yourself on a piece of paper or look at it more closely at the simulation itself.

deb

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Re: Transverse Wave and Longitudinal Wave
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2008, 12:41:33 am »
This java applet let you visualize the difference between transverse wave and longitudinal wave.
 You will find both moving wave and standing wave.
<applet width="520" height="180" codebase="/java/waveType/" code="waveType.class"><param name="twave" value="transverse wave"><param name="lwave" value="longitudinal wave"><param name="shead" value="distance between dots = "><param name="unit" value=" wavelength"></applet>
<hr>
 Usage :
1. You can view transverse wave or longitudinal wave from the above selection.
2. Those blue lines on the left are dispacements relative to the equilibrium point, while those red lines on the right are relate to velocity of wave medium at those points.
3. The distance between two circle dots are 0.5 wavelength. (moving out of phase)
   Click and drag left mouse button to move them horizontally but keep the same distances.
   Click the right mouse button to locate position for one of the black dot,
   drag the right mouse button to position the second one.
   The distance between dots will be shown in unit of wavelength.
 4. Click the right mouse button and release it at the same location to toggle the animation.
The article is very useful for my studies,thanks