Author Topic: periscope  (Read 26607 times)

Fu-Kwun Hwang

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periscope
« on: December 05, 2009, 12:11:25 pm »
A periscope is an instrument for observation from a concealed position. In its simplest form, it is a tube in each end of which are mirrors set parallel to each other at 45 degree angle.

The size of the image is the same as the object.

The questions is: What will happen if the object is moving up?
a. The image will move up, too!
b. The image will stay at the same height.
c. The image will move down.

Make a guess before you play with it and find out the answer by yourself.

-*-

The following is a simulation for periscope (with two flat mirrors).
Click trace checkbox to view the trace of light path (which form the image)
You can drag the object at the top right position with your mouse and watch how the light paths changed.
 

Full screen applet or Problem viewing java?Add http://www.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/ to exception site list
Press the Alt key and the left mouse button to drag the applet off the browser and onto the desktop. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Taiwan License
  • Please feel free to post your ideas about how to use the simulation for better teaching and learning.
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Let's work together. We can help more users understand physics conceptually and enjoy the fun of learning physics!


For the following case: the same question again

What will happen if the object is moving up?
a. The image will move up, too!
b. The image will stay at the same height.
c. The image will move down.

More information about periscope can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periscope

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74vYKL3OYAc

lookang

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Re: periscope
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2009, 09:14:17 pm »
the model used to simulate the periscope seems to need some more refinement.
the bug is attached. ;D

Fu-Kwun Hwang

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Re: periscope
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2009, 10:47:05 pm »
Thank you! The bug has been fixed. :-)