Author Topic: Ohm's Law  (Read 13977 times)

Fu-Kwun Hwang

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Ohm's Law
« on: June 05, 2009, 06:21:44 pm »
Ohm's Law: The current through a conductor between two points is directly proportional to the potential difference or voltage across the two points, and inversely proportional to the resistance between them.

$I=frac{V}{R}$

where V is the potential difference measured across the resistance in units of volts; I is the current through the resistance in units of amperes and R is the resistance of the conductor in units of ohms (?).

The following applet is a simulation for AC and DC circuit.
You can click the resistor to add it to the circuit or remove it from the circuit.
The same is true for batterys for DC circuit.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlCegcZTQmI

Full screen applet or Problem viewing java?Add http://www.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/ to exception site list
Press the Alt key and the left mouse button to drag the applet off the browser and onto the desktop. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Taiwan License
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juana17

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Re: Ohm's Law
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2009, 03:51:58 pm »
Ohm's Law: The current through a conductor between two points is directly proportional to the potential difference or voltage across the two points, and inversely proportional to the resistance between them.

$I=frac{V}{R}$

where V is the potential difference measured across the resistance in units of volts; I is the current through the resistance in units of amperes and R is the resistance of the conductor in units of ohms (?).

The following applet is a simulation for AC and DC circuit.
You can click the resistor to add it to the circuit or remove it from the circuit.
The same is true for batterys for DC circuit.




Ohm's law applies to electrical circuits it states that the current through a conductor between two points is directly proportional to the potential difference or voltage across the two points, and inversely proportional to the resistance between them.



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Hzhane

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Re: Ohm's Law
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2009, 11:22:17 am »
   I just remember this topic since my high school day. Thanks for the information.

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Fu-Kwun Hwang

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Re: Ohm's Law
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2010, 10:24:09 pm »
$Requivfrac{V}{I}$ is definition of resistor. This relation alone is not Ohm's law.

We say a resistor obey ohm's law if it's resistance R is a constant. i.e. Voltage divided by current is a constant.
Current is propotional to voltage in a linear way.