Metalic conductor Based on an animation of the Supercomet 2 project by Francisco Esquembre and Maria Jose Cano, Universidad de Murcia
found a lot of simulations here
thought it would be good for the simulation to live on here
http://www.um.es/fem/EjsWiki/Main/Links

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How can a lot of loose electrons cause a metal to be a good conductor?
This is because each electron is an electric charge that is free to move. Moving electric charges can make up a current. But this is only true if they move the same way.

Due to thermal kinetic energy of the electrons and ions in the metal, these conduction electrons move in a random, disordered way, with a velocity close to 106 m/s. In total, however, they have zero net velocity because their motion is not ordered.

However, if an external field is applied, then the net motion of the electrons will follow the field.