NTNUJAVA Virtual Physics Laboratory
Enjoy the fun of physics with simulations!
Backup site http://enjoy.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/ntnujava/
May 23, 2019, 12:37:12 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
The softest thing overcomes the hardest thing in the universe. ...Lao Tzu (570-490 BC)
Google Bookmarks Yahoo My Web MSN Live Netscape Del.icio.us FURL Stumble Upon Delirious Ask FaceBook

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Newton's cradle  (Read 9160 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. Click to toggle author information(expand message area).
ahmedelshfie
Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 954



«
Embed this message
on: October 18, 2010, 04:35:37 pm » posted from:SAO PAULO,SAO PAULO,BRAZIL

This applet is Newton's cradle design by prof Hwang, Modified by Ahmed.
Original applet Newton's cradle

Newton's cradle, named after Sir Isaac Newton, is a device that demonstrates conservation of momentum and energy via a series of swinging spheres.
When one on the end is lifted and released, the resulting force travels through the line and pushes the last one upward.
The device is also known as an executive ball clicker, Newton's balls or balance balls.

Embed a running copy of this simulation

Embed a running copy link(show simulation in a popuped window)
Full screen applet or Problem viewing java?Add http://www.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/ to exception site list
Press the Alt key and the left mouse button to drag the applet off the browser and onto the desktop. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Taiwan License
  • Please feel free to post your ideas about how to use the simulation for better teaching and learning.
  • Post questions to be asked to help students to think, to explore.
  • Upload worksheets as attached files to share with more users.
Let's work together. We can help more users understand physics conceptually and enjoy the fun of learning physics!


* Newton's cradle.jpg (22.97 KB, 488x535 - viewed 816 times.)

* -Newtons_cradle_animation.gif (449.89 KB, 200x150 - viewed 1534 times.)

* Cradle.jpg (125.37 KB, 717x599 - viewed 2559 times.)
« Last Edit: October 20, 2010, 05:50:07 pm by ahmedelshfie » Logged
ahmedelshfie
Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 954



«
Embed this message
Reply #1 on: October 20, 2010, 05:03:58 pm » posted from:SAO PAULO,SAO PAULO,BRAZIL

Newton's cradle, named after Sir Isaac Newton, is a device that demonstrates conservation of momentum and energy via a series of swinging spheres.
When one on the end is lifted and released, the resulting force travels through the line and pushes the last one upward.
The device is also known as an executive ball clicker, Newton's balls or balance balls.
Construction:
A typical Newton's cradle consists of a series of identically sized metal balls suspended in a metal frame so that they are just touching each other at rest.
Each ball is attached to the frame by two wires of equal length angled away from each other.
This restricts the pendulums' movements to the same plane.
Action:
If one ball is pulled away and is let to fall, it strikes the first ball in the series and comes to a dead stop. The ball on the opposite side of the series acquires the momentum of the first ball almost instantly and swings in an arc that one would expect of the first ball.
The first time observer may find this visually intriguing and counter-intuitive. If a person charged into one end of a row of adjacent people then one would intuitively expect the whole row of people to be moved, rather than the last person in the row to acquire the kinetic energy.
The intermediate balls appear stationary. In fact, the cradle continues to work even if the intermediate balls are physically clamped still. This is also counter intuitive - transmitting motion without moving.
What actually happens is that the first impact produces a shock wave that propagates through the intermediate balls. A hard material such as steel is very good at doing this.
The shock wave travels at the speed of sound in the medium. The speed of sound in steel is much faster (around 4699 m/s) than in air (around 343 m/s). The time to travel a few centimeters is too small for human perception, and so is the physical distortion of the balls as the shock wave passes through them.
In the real world, none of these processes has perfect efficiency. Energy is lost in the suspending wires, friction of the surrounding air, elastic deformation (warming) of the balls, and sound. The last is obvious as the clicking of the balls can be heard. Toward the end of oscillation, even the intermediate balls are jiggling a bit.
Further intrigue is provided by starting more than one ball in motion. With two balls, exactly two balls on the opposite side swing out and back. While this is satisfyingly symmetrical, why could not one opposite ball swing out twice as fast, or four balls at quarter speed? Having the same number of balls swing on each side conserves both energy and momentum.
More than half the balls can be set in motion - for example three of five will result in the central ball swinging without abrupt cessation or resumption of motion.
Data from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton's_cradle#Construction

American Science and Surplus - Newton's Cradle



« Last Edit: October 20, 2010, 05:55:47 pm by ahmedelshfie » Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
The softest thing overcomes the hardest thing in the universe. ...Lao Tzu (570-490 BC)
 
Jump to:  


Related Topics
Subject Started by Replies Views Last post
Newton
Molecular Workbench
concord 0 11191 Last post August 21, 2005, 09:17:42 am
by concord
Newton cradle
Questions related to EJS
lookang 16 24435 Last post June 17, 2008, 07:12:04 am
by Fu-Kwun Hwang
Newton's law of gravitation/board:26-3-
Request for physics Simulations
Rare 6 10699 Last post October 03, 2009, 08:51:21 am
by Fu-Kwun Hwang
Newton's Cradle by lookang
Simulations from other web sites
ahmedelshfie 3 10792 Last post June 30, 2015, 06:47:55 pm
by dana304
Newton's cradle
Dynamics
Fu-Kwun Hwang 9 17823 Last post November 28, 2010, 09:58:46 pm
by Fu-Kwun Hwang
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.053 seconds with 24 queries.since 2011/06/15