NTNUJAVA Virtual Physics Laboratory
Enjoy the fun of physics with simulations!
Backup site http://enjoy.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/ntnujava/
December 11, 2017, 07:26:20 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Never too late. Never too early. ...Wisdom
Google Bookmarks Yahoo My Web MSN Live Netscape Del.icio.us FURL Stumble Upon Delirious Ask FaceBook

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: skiing over a bump  (Read 17994 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. Click to toggle author information(expand message area).
Fu-Kwun Hwang
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3080



WWW
«
Embed this message
on: May 18, 2009, 10:02:38 pm » posted from:Taipei,T\'ai-pei,Taiwan

This is an email message from Michael:
Quote
Dear Fu-Kwun,

I have a new simulation idea – skiing over a bump.

Pedagogical targets

a) To show the variation of the normal force as the skier goes over a bump (undulation)
b) To show that the skier at a certain speed becomes airborne (loss of snow contact)
c) To show the difference between skiing with stiff and springy legs, i.e. a certain amount of suspension.

Initial variables to play with

1) Initial speed (0 to 100 km/h)
2) The height of the bump (10 to 100 cm)
3) Skier´s weight (20-100 kg)
4) Stiff/springy legs (yes or no)


The bump could comprise a segment of a circle or an ellipse to facilitate the computation. Perhaps a single step option would make it easier to follow the variation of the normal force?

Is this something that could be accomplished?

The following is my first version of simulation for skiing over a bump.
I still need to find a way to show the difference between skiing with stiff and springy legs.
The difference between skiing with stiff and springy legs has been implemented: change the k with the slider.
Stiff legs is corresponds to larger k. The stiffness of the leg is simulated with a spring (spring constant k).

Vx_zero is the velocity when skier move to staring point of the arc (i.e. x=0 in the simulation coordinate)
You can drag skier when the simulation is "paused".

Embed a running copy of this simulation

Embed a running copy link(show simulation in a popuped window)
Full screen applet or Problem viewing java?Add http://www.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/ to exception site list
Press the Alt key and the left mouse button to drag the applet off the browser and onto the desktop. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Taiwan License
  • Please feel free to post your ideas about how to use the simulation for better teaching and learning.
  • Post questions to be asked to help students to think, to explore.
  • Upload worksheets as attached files to share with more users.
Let's work together. We can help more users understand physics conceptually and enjoy the fun of learning physics!


* skijump3.gif (2.54 KB, 807x478 - viewed 499 times.)
Logged
ikuraru
watchlist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3

: 1 users think this message is good
2 Re: skiing over a bump
«
Embed this message
Reply #1 on: January 19, 2010, 10:09:26 am » posted from:Jakarta,Jakarta Raya,Indonesia

waw, I don' understand, huh...
I am sorry
-*-
Logged
nikolo
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: -9

«
Embed this message
Reply #2 on: December 23, 2010, 12:57:00 am » posted from:Kiev,Kyyivs\'ka Oblast\',Ukraine

interesting, thanks!
Logged
stevenfrank38
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1

«
Embed this message
Reply #3 on: April 29, 2011, 08:23:21 am » posted from:Dhaka,Dhaka,Bangladesh

I have started to learn simulation recently. Your post is helpful for me. But I need more help. I will ask you about it later.

Thank you..
Logged
Judson
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1

«
Embed this message
Reply #4 on: July 12, 2011, 02:09:19 pm » posted from:SEOUL,KYONGGI-DO,KOREA, REPUBLIC OF

I am also learning this, very interesting ... Smiley -*-
Logged
ujkjk
watchlist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1

«
Embed this message
Reply #5 on: April 12, 2012, 01:31:43 pm » posted from:,,Satellite Provider

Always refreshing to hear a rational answer.
-*-
Logged
moli.rumi
watchlist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1

«
Embed this message
Reply #6 on: December 20, 2012, 02:20:46 pm » posted from:Dhaka,Dhaka,Bangladesh

If you want to learn how to ski bumps then you need to learn how to ski the
easiest and slowest green line route through the moguls.-*-
Logged
danielemateriale
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 48


«
Embed this message
Reply #7 on: June 25, 2013, 11:41:28 pm » posted from:MILANO,LOMBARDIA,ITALY

hello I would like to propose a simulation, which I need so much Smiley
2D in a magnetic field that increases with the x axis, then has a maximum, and then returns to zero value as a function gaussina. see photo. the particle part in any point of this plane and with the direction to be set. also the speed and mass are to be set and charge.

on the 2D plane in the point x, y have the cmapo varies with xe, remains constant along y. you can set a starting point as the point (xo, yo) where B (tesla) is almost zero and choose the direction of the particle.

You can do the following:
1) Divide the plan, of length x and height y, in vertical strips of known width.
2) manually assign a value of the magnetic field in each strip
3)the field is constant in each vertical strip
4) manually select a point in the plane
5) manually choose a direction in the plane
6) assign charge, mass, velocity, to the particle
7) go the simulation!

then in fig1 explain what must do the program in steps. first step to divide the plane into strips of very great height and thickness of three or more mm and assign the field to each one. the field is constant in each strip but it is different from the strip and the strip. or it can be the same depending on the assignment. second step assign a point and a direction to the particle. third step, run the simulation.

in fig2 explain the graphical method for ottenre the result, in any direction goes away, the particle, the radius of curvature is always perpendicular to the direction of the particle. in the band starting the radius of curvature is constant. the particle is a portion of circumference. Now I draw the tangent line to the curve O | and the radius is perpendicalore to this line so the design and so on.

set the time in ns the lenght in mm velocity m/s field in tesla charge in coulomb mass in kg

the application is scientific to know if the particle at a given velocity and mass passes through the field or bounces back.

thanks

i can't open new topoi because a error of database
Logged
danielemateriale
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 48


«
Embed this message
Reply #8 on: June 25, 2013, 11:52:03 pm » posted from:MILANO,LOMBARDIA,ITALY

a image of the program future


* Immagine (3).jpg (88.38 KB, 519x763 - viewed 433 times.)
Logged
CamKrist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1

«
Embed this message
Reply #9 on: July 12, 2013, 08:02:17 pm »

Similar subject was being discussed at yahoo answers last week. I can post the link if needed.
Logged
harshgroom
watchlist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2

«
Embed this message
Reply #10 on: December 22, 2014, 02:13:51 pm » posted from:New Delhi,Delhi,India

its christmas time merry christmas to all of you Wish you a merry christmas
Logged
varunmix
watchlist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4

«
Embed this message
Reply #11 on: December 28, 2014, 10:40:18 pm » posted from:Hyderabad,Andhra Pradesh,India

skiing over a bump is a good practice see here yennai arindhaal songs download can u get over it
Logged
aran
watchlist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2

«
Embed this message
Reply #12 on: January 24, 2015, 10:32:46 pm » posted from:Kolkata,West Bengal,India

Wow...this is just awesome...loved the whole idea..will be writing an article on it on my personal blog very soon. It sounds too cool man.-*-
Logged
rickytan
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1

«
Embed this message
Reply #13 on: March 28, 2015, 04:01:45 pm » posted from:Secunderabad,Andhra Pradesh,India

nice site
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
Never too late. Never too early. ...Wisdom
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.057 seconds with 22 queries.since 2011/06/15