NTNUJAVA Virtual Physics Laboratory
Enjoy the fun of physics with simulations!
Backup site http://enjoy.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/ntnujava/

Easy Java Simulations (2001- ) => Kinematics => Topic started by: Fu-Kwun Hwang on June 15, 2013, 11:13:48 am



Title: Coriolis effect
Post by: Fu-Kwun Hwang on June 15, 2013, 11:13:48 am
In physics, the Coriolis effect is a deflection of moving objects when they are viewed in a rotating reference frame. In a reference frame with clockwise rotation, the deflection is to the left of the motion of the object; in one with counter-clockwise rotation, the deflection is to the right.
The following simulation help you visualize the Coriolis effect!


Click the following image to show the simulation.
[eye][ejsapplet][/eye]


Title: Re: Coriolis effect
Post by: lookang on February 12, 2018, 12:03:34 pm
I have recreated a JavaScript version of this simulation
http://iwant2study.org/ospsg/index.php/interactive-resources/physics/02-newtonian-mechanics/05-circle/623-coriolis2d

enjoy!


Title: Re: Coriolis effect
Post by: lookang on February 18, 2019, 02:40:11 pm
Dear Prof Hwang,

I think I fixed a bug

//x3=x-y*Math.sin(c); //Rotating with Disk Viewpoint apparent trajectory
//y3=y-y*(1-Math.cos(c));
x3=x+y*Math.sin(c); //Rotating with Disk Viewpoint apparent trajectory MUST change to + instead of -
y3=y-y*(1-Math.cos(c));
//if(y<-R)_initialize();
if(y<-R)_pause(); // added pause by lookang
//vx3=vx-y*w*Math.cos(c)-vy*Math.sin(c);
//vy3=vy-y*w*Math.sin(c)-vy*(1-Math.cos(c));
vx3=vx+y*w*Math.cos(c)+vy*Math.sin(c); // differentiate
vy3=vy-y*w*Math.sin(c)-vy*(1-Math.cos(c));

Then the rotation is correct



Title: Re: Coriolis effect
Post by: Fu-Kwun Hwang on February 19, 2019, 06:29:09 pm
Very good. Thanks!

 :D