NTNUJAVA Virtual Physics Laboratory
Enjoy the fun of physics with simulations!
Backup site http://enjoy.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/ntnujava/

Easy Java Simulations (2001- ) => Collaborative Community of EJS => Topic started by: engrg1 on February 22, 2012, 04:04:09 pm



Title: Free Fall Diagram for Primary School Students
Post by: engrg1 on February 22, 2012, 04:04:09 pm
Here is the free fall java applet that I have remixed for the students.
The original source code is written by Andrew Duffy and can be found in
 http://www.opensourcephysics.org/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=10001&DocID=1639 (http://www.opensourcephysics.org/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=10001&DocID=1639)

Here are the changes that I have made :
(1) Remove the graphs
(2) Do have 3 free fall diagrams.
(3) Add in the "arrow" for the weight.



Feel free to comment!



Title: Re: Free Fall Diagram for Primary School Students
Post by: engrg1 on February 23, 2012, 12:56:00 pm
Have remixed a 2nd verison. Allows the students to change the intial height , velocity and mass for each place.

Possible usuage:
1. Let the students design an experiment and find out which place exerts the greatest force
The intial values are set differently so as to see if the students can design an accurate experiment.


Title: Re: Free Fall Diagram for Primary School Students
Post by: Fu-Kwun Hwang on February 23, 2012, 02:22:29 pm
If you want to keep different versions, you can upload jar file for each of them. As you have done above.

You can open "modified message page" and upload jar file again to replace previous jar file if you just want to keep the latest version.


Title: Re: Free Fall Diagram for Primary School Students
Post by: lookang on August 13, 2012, 07:39:18 am
vector drawing force down and a magnitude of negative value is it confusing for students?



for your consideration




Title: Re: Free Fall Diagram for Primary School Students
Post by: engrg1 on August 19, 2012, 11:03:56 am
Thank , Lookang. Will look into this.
This applet is too difficult for the primary school.
Will think hard how to simplify it without losing the "physics" behind it.